Archive for: November, 2015

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    Inventor You Should Know: Peter Muller-Munk

    Berlin-born and Pittsburgh-based designer and inventor Peter Muller-Munk has been posthumously honored with an exhibit at the Carnegie Museum of Art. The exhibit details his industrial design career and includes his best known products, like the Normandie pitcher and the Waring waterfall blender. Muller-Munk immigrated to the United States in 1926, pre-Depression era, where he…

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    Generate Ideas with “Flow”

    It’s a demanding time of year with no limit to distractions, anxieties, and compounding responsibilities. Maybe you’ve had to pause on a passion project. Maybe you feel like you just aren’t producing anything of value. If you’ve hit a roadblock in your creative output, it’s important to take a brain-break. Have you played recently? When…

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    A Tribute to Veteran Inventors

    Veterans Day is an opportunity to celebrate the brave men and women who have served, or continue to serve, in our U.S. Armed Forces.  It is their sacrifice and dedication that has ultimately afforded us the freedom to shape our ideas, to create, and to offer our unique contributions to our country. The work of…

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    Makers: The Importance of STEM

    What is STEM? STEM refers to the academic disciplines of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. The grouping informs policy and curriculum in the United States education system, most prominently, representing a contemporary focus on analytical development. There are several variations of this concept. eSTEM adds environmental considerations to the instruction of these disciplines. STREM includes…

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    Inventor You Should Know: Thomas Jennings

    Surely, scientist Madame C.J. Walker, astronomer Benjamin Banneker, and agricultural chemist George Washington Carver come to mind as legendary African American inventors. They are rightly celebrated as influential contributors to a rich culture of innovation, but they represent a great number of unnamed inventors—brilliant African American men and women who developed efficient processes and technologies…

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    Slinky: Is A Spring Toy a Good Idea?

    In 1943, Richard James, a naval mechanical engineer, sought to produce springs capable of stabilizing fragile ship equipment while at sea. He made prototypes of his idea and set them on a shelf. Then, one day, he accidentally knocked them over. He watched as they “slinked” off the shelf, onto a stack of books, down…